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Lesson Plan for Service-Learning
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St_therese.jpg
Save Our Community.... One Student at a Time
 
A Lesson Plan for Educators, Students and People in their Community..
Created on October 1, 2011.
The Feast Day of St. Therese of the Child Jesus
 
Laura Ann Osterman
Founder and President
Heaven's Miraculous Angelic Giving Inspirational Child, Inc. 

 

 

Objective- Introduce Service-Learning to students/educators, write a persuasive essay/business letter/friendly letter to people in the community, reflect on how service learning can be implemented in the classroom, school and community and lay the foundation to help educators and students design service-learning curriculum in the future. 

 

 

Anticipatory Set

 

Think of a time when you were frustrated about something in your community.

 

Turn to your partner and tell them what it was and what you did about

it.

 

Service-Learning is.....

 

Definition

 

The National Corporation for National Service defines Service-Learning as a methodology in which individuals learn by engaging in organized activities that meet a community’s needs, are coordinated with schools or programs, instill civic service responsibility, are combined with district and state curriculum performance objectives and create opportunities to be reflective in oral and written forms (C.S.N Act 1990).

 

Activity------Please highlight the significant words in the definition.

 

Activity Please create a Meaningful Sentence using Service-Learning.

Please turn to your partner and share that definition.

  

 

Ant/Syn

 

Picture

Info…

Old Stats..

According to the Los Angeles Times the US spent 60 billion to keep people incarcerated in 2004

 

Teenage pregnancy cost the nation 9.1 billion dollars 2004

 

Teenage pregnancy cost the state of Arizona 252 million dollars 2004

 

It can't be any better in 20011 given the situation we are currently facing...

 

69,352,000,000 saved would provide over 1 billion per state in savings...

 

 

 

Activity …..The Research

 

Please divide up into teams of no more than 4 and read and highlight the word service-learning and  reflect on your page with regards to service learning.

 

Service-Learning

Service-Learning’s roots can be traced back to popular philosophies in education by John Dewey, Jean Piaget and Alexis De Touqueville. These philosophers and scholars believed that the most productive learning environment occurred when students were actively involved in their education and learning because there was a distinct purpose ( Billig,2000;Anderson et al. 1991; Stanton et al. 1999).

Major components of Service-Learning include engaging in organized learning activities and experiences, focusing on the community’s needs, combining academics and curriculum, reflecting through oral or written language, having the opportunity to apply skills and knowledge in real world situations and creating a sense of caring for others who are less fortunate (Bhaerman et al., 1998; Billig, 2000; Schon 1983; Noddings, 1992). In addition, some believe that Service-Learning is beneficial to the person engaged in service as well as the person receiving the service while providing reflection of the experience and utilization of academic skills (Schon,1983 ; Taylor, 1996). With regards to education reform Service-Learning has been considered a way to reinvigorate citizenship and create responsible caring citizens (Shaffer,1993 ; Boyte, 1991 ; Barber, 1993 ; Sagwa & Halperin, 1993 ; Goodlad, 1998 ; Noddings, 1992). In a constructivist, theoretical and philosophical light, Service-Learning has been referred to as a tool to enhance curriculum and align the standards. Furthermore, some have viewed it as an excellent way to expose students to opportunities in the real world and career oriented professions while creating a stronger sense of belongingness in school (Carin, 1992 ; Billig & Kraft, 1998 ; Owens & Wang, 1997 ; Howell, 1997).

A plethora of research between the years of 1985-2000 involving students from kindergarten through twelfth grade indicates that educators have a strong desire to implement Service-Learning activities into their classrooms and that Service-Learning has many positive effects while it significantly effects the lives of those who are involved in Service-Learning. With regards to personal development, Service-Learning has shown increases in responsibility, communication and competence. In addition, those who engage in Service-Learning tend to value responsibility more and have a higher sense of responsibility than those lacking the experience. Furthermore, when compared to students without opportunities for service-learning, participants of Service-Learning activities viewed themselves as more socially competent and they were more likely to treat others in a kind manner, assist others in need and care about doing the best they could do in a variety of situations both inside and outside of the classroom. Finally, they showed increases in their self esteem, their sense of self worth and there were fewer behavior problems (Weiler et al., 1998 ; Lemming, 1998 ; Scales & Blyth, 1997 ; Berkas 1997, Shaffer, 1993 ; G. Switzer et al.,1995 ; Billig, 2000 ; Noddings, 1992).

 

In the area of relating and accepting others from a diverse setting of cultures, Service-Learners were more trustworthy, trusting and reliable. They were more likely to bond with the elderly and disabled and showed more empathy towards those who were less fortunate. In addition, they showed increases in their self awareness of cultural differences and a desire towards helping others. Furthermore, they became more dependable and had higher comfort levels relating to ethnically diverse groups. Finally, Service-Learners felt less alienated from others, had fewer problems with behavior and were less likely to be sent to the administrator for disciplinary reasons (Sephens, 1995 ; Follman, 1998 ; Melchoir, 1998 ; Morgan & Streb, 1999 ; Neal et al., 1994 ; Berkas, 1997 ; Shaffer, 1993 ; Loesh-Griffin et al., 1995).

Students involved in Service-Learning of a higher quality purported that they had increased their awareness of the community’s needs. They thought and felt like they could make a difference in their community in the future and that they had made meaningful contributions while they were engaged in higher levels of commitment towards serving others. Older students reflected more on politics and the operation of the United States Government. They showed increased interest in politics and political events and causes and considered how they might be able to make and sustain social changes. They also became more involved in community organizations, showed more responsibility towards voting and considered how they might be able to make and sustain social changes in contrast to children who did not participate. Students of all ages showed an increased awareness of civic responsibility, had higher moral character and were more ethical about serving those who were less fortunate ( (Melchoir, 1999 ; Westhemier & Khane, 2000 ; Yates & Youniss 1996, ; Perry, 1996 ; Morgan & Streb, 1999 ; Billig & Conrad, 1997 ; Scales & Blyth, 1997 ; Stephens, 1995 ; Berkas, 1997 ; Youniss et al., 1997 ; O’ Bannon, 1999 ; Billig, 2000).

With recent increased focus on standardized testing and scores, the public should take notice of the fact that Service-Learning increases academic skills and concept attainment. Specifically, gains on achievement tests have shown between slight to significant ranges in reading and writing. Students in Service-Learning curriculum became more engaged in classroom instruction and activities and showed more interest in completing their homework. In addition, higher scores were attained on state assessments. They earned higher grades and increased their grade point averages in 83% of the schools 76% of the time. In the area of reading for information in mathematics, students who participated in Service-Learning had higher scores than students who were not given the opportunity. On a crucial note for inner city administrators and educators, older students who participated in Service-Learning were less likely to become drop outs, engage in unprotected sex, become teenage parents and/or get involved in violent behavior and criminal activity. Furthermore, students of all ages who participated in Service-Learning had higher attendance percentages, were less likely to be tardy, were able to complete their class assignments more frequently, were more active with regards to class participation, showed improvement in problem solving skills, were more interested in the learning process as a whole and felt that they had learned more in Service-Learning experiences than others. Finally, with regards towards future career aspirations,  Service-Learners were better prepared for their future careers. They had more communication skills and became more aware of the opportunities and possibilities toward a variety of future careers (Weiler, 1998 ; Anderson, 1991 ; Schmuer, 1994 ; Shaffer, 1993 ; Dean & Murdock, 1992 ; O’Bannon, 1999 ; Akuiobi & Simmons, 1997 ; Billig et al., 1999 ;  Follman, 1997 ; Supik, 1996 ; Billig, 2000 ; Rolzinski, 1990 ; Duckenfield & Swanson, 1992 ; Loesch-Griffin et al., 1995 ; Stephens, 1995 ; Billig & Conrad, 1997 ; Melchoir, 1999 ; Weiler et al. 1998 ; Berkas, 1997 ; O’ Donnel et al., 1999 ; Allen et al., 1994). In schools that participated in Service-Learning curriculum, students were more respectful towards their teachers and showed higher levels of camaraderie and cohesiveness with their teachers.

In addition, there was less student mobility and teacher turnover in schools that focused on Service-Learning. Furthermore, it created more discussion with regards to creative teaching techniques and the reflective process. Educators became more collaborative and were involved in curriculum, instruction, and planning. Finally, on the other end of the spectrum, the community viewed students and schools involved in Service-Learning in a more positive light than students who were not involved in Service-Learning (Weiler et al., 1998 ; Berkas, 1997 ; Billig & Conrad, 1997 ; Pickeral, 1998 ; Melchior, 1999 ; Kinsley, 1997 ; Wade, 1997 ; Anderson et al. , 1991 Kingsland et al. 1995).

In conclusion, between the years of 1984-1997 Service-Learning grew tremendously. The number of students involved in Service-Learning increased by over ten million. Public schools now purport student’s involvement in Service-Learning to be between sixty and eighty percent. In addition, over fifty percent of articles written with regards to Service-Learning were viewed as favorable and/or supportive. Service-Learning has shown valid and reliable research in qualitative and quantitative meta analyses and quasi experimental studies along with affirmative reports and testimony for administrators, educators and students. It benefits everyone involved by creating a more productive learning environment and more responsible members of society. Furthermore, Service-Learning appears to be a legitimate way to educate children and there is substantial evidence that Service-Learning should be combined with national, state and district performance objectives and expectations. Finally, individuals from all Service-Learning groups make a difference when they are willing to go out into their community and serve those who are less fortunate. For those conditions, as well as others, they begin to reflect on existing conditions and possible ways to create social changes. They receive social and academic skills and engage in meaningful experiences that last a lifetime (Conrad & Hedin, 1991 ; Newmann & Rutter, ; APCO Associates, 1999 ; Skinner & Chapman, 1999 ; Billig, 2000).

 

 

 

Consider your standards as an individual student/educator and as a team.

 

How can you implement service learning in your classroom?

 

Activity------Design a web of

Who, What, Where, When, Why, and How you can implement Service-Learning in your classroom?

 

Consider the state standards and your IB units.

 

Activity……Students/educators present their webs of how they could implement Service-Learning in their community.

 

Homework  Activity-----Write a persuasive essay/business letter/friendly letter to people in the community, addressed to .... Choose one, the leader or representative of your country, your state, your city, a CEO in the community.

 

 

Close----

 

In conclusion, between the years of 1984-1997 Service-Learning grew tremendously. The number of students involved in Service-Learning increased by over ten million. Public schools now purport student’s involvement in Service-Learning to be between sixty and eighty percent. In addition, over fifty percent of articles written with regards to Service-Learning were viewed as favorable and/or supportive. Service-Learning has shown valid and reliable research in qualitative and quantitative meta analyses and quasi experimental studies along with affirmative reports and testimony for administrators, educators and students. It benefits everyone involved by creating a more productive learning environment and more responsible members of society. Furthermore, Service-Learning appears to be a legitimate way to educate children and there is substantial evidence that Service-Learning should be combined with national, state and district performance objectives and expectations. Finally, individuals from all Service-Learning groups make a difference when they are willing to go out into their community and serve those who are less fortunate. For those conditions, as well as others, they begin to reflect on existing conditions and possible ways to create social changes. They receive social and academic skills and engage in meaningful experiences that last a lifetime (Conrad & Hedin, 1991 ; Newmann & Rutter, ; APCO Associates, 1999 ; Skinner & Chapman, 1999 ; Billig, 2000).

 

Today you have learned how much money was spent in 2004 on services for people who have not had the opportunity to engage in service learning and how the children can not only be saved, but thrive by the proactive way of implementing service learning in your curriculum and community.

 

You have brainstormed ways to implement service learning in your classroom. 

 

You can change the world!

 

For educators…Now write down a number of how much you would like to be compensated for saving the children lives, and the taxpayers' dollars.

Visualize that as your raise from the state and the community in the future.

 

 

For students… Now go and write down a wish list for your school.

Visualize that as your reward from the state and the community in the future.

 

Please rise up from your seats.

 

Visualize a time when you felt successful and you were on top of the world!

 

Breathe like you were at that time

Stand like you were at that time

 

 

Please repeat after me with a lot of enthusiasm.

 

I believe in miracles!

 

With God All things are possible J

 

If you think you can't, you are probably right, if you think you can, you will change the world!

 

In the future, they will be coming....I trust that you will impress them with your service to your community.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9oZXJD1NVW0

 

 

Thank you for your time:)

 

Thank you Google ! Innocent 

 

 

 

Materials/Resources-

Copies of the definition Service-Learning

Copies of  the Service-Learning Research and The GIVE Act..

http://www.curriki.org/xwiki/bin/view/Coll_HeavensMAGIC/SaveOurCommunityOneStudentataTimeALessonPlanforEducatorsStudentsandPeopleintheirCommunity 

 

Highlighters

Butcher paper

IPhone-Index cards for the 21st century

K-8    Curriculum

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9oZXJD1NVW0

Copy of the lesson plan “Save Our Community.... One Student at a Time” for every teacher in school

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resources for Lesson  Please Make one copy..

 

 

The National Corporation for National Service defines Service-Learning as a methodology in which individuals learn by engaging in organized activities that meet a community’s needs, are coordinated with schools or programs, instill civic service responsibility, are combined with district and state curriculum performance objectives and create opportunities to be reflective in oral and written forms (C.S.N Act 1990).

 

 

 

 

Copy of the the Lyrics

Des'ree
"Gotta Be"
 

Service-Learning

The National Corporation for National Service defines Service-Learning as a methodology in which individuals learn by engaging in organized activities that meet a community’s needs, are coordinated with schools or programs, instill civic service responsibility, are combined with district and state curriculum performance objectives and create opportunities to be reflective in oral and written forms (C.S.N Act 1990).

Service-Learning’s roots can be traced back to popular philosophies in education by John Dewey, Jean Piaget and Alexis De Touqueville. These philosophers and scholars believed that the most productive learning environment occurred when students were actively involved in their education and learning because there was a distinct purpose ( Billig,2000;Anderson et al. 1991; Stanton et al. 1999).

Major components of Service-Learning include engaging in organized learning activities and experiences, focusing on the community’s needs, combining academics and curriculum, reflecting through oral or written language, having the opportunity to apply skills and knowledge in real world situations and creating a sense of caring for others who are less fortunate (Bhaerman et al., 1998; Billig, 2000; Schon 1983; Noddings, 1992). In addition, some believe that Service-Learning is beneficial to the person engaged in service as well as the person receiving the service while providing reflection of the experience and utilization of academic skills (Schon,1983 ; Taylor, 1996). With regards to education reform Service-Learning has been considered a way to reinvigorate citizenship and create responsible caring citizens (Shaffer,1993 ; Boyte, 1991 ; Barber, 1993 ; Sagwa & Halperin, 1993 ; Goodlad, 1998 ; Noddings, 1992). In a constructivist, theoretical and philosophical light, Service-Learning has been referred to as a tool to enhance curriculum and align the standards. Furthermore, some have viewed it as an excellent way to expose students to opportunities in the real world and career oriented professions while creating a stronger sense of belongingness in school (Carin, 1992 ; Billig & Kraft, 1998 ; Owens & Wang, 1997 ; Howell, 1997).

A plethora of research between the years of 1985-2000 involving students from kindergarten through twelfth grade indicates that educators have a strong desire to implement Service-Learning activities into their classrooms and that Service-Learning has many positive effects while it significantly effects the lives of those who are involved in Service-Learning. With regards to personal development, Service-Learning has shown increases in responsibility, communication and competence. In addition, those who engage in Service-Learning tend to value responsibility more and have a higher sense of responsibility than those lacking the experience. Furthermore, when compared to students without opportunities for service-learning, participants of Service-Learning activities viewed themselves as more socially competent and they were more likely to treat others in a kind manner, assist others in need and care about doing the best they could do in a variety of situations both inside and outside of the classroom. Finally, they showed increases in their self esteem, their sense of self worth and there were fewer behavior problems (Weiler et al., 1998 ; Lemming, 1998 ; Scales & Blyth, 1997 ; Berkas 1997, Shaffer, 1993 ; G. Switzer et al.,1995 ; Billig, 2000 ; Noddings, 1992).

In the area of relating and accepting others from a diverse setting of cultures, Service-Learners were more trustworthy, trusting and reliable. They were more likely to bond with the elderly and disabled and showed more empathy towards those who were less fortunate. In addition, they showed increases in their self awareness of cultural differences and a desire towards helping others. Furthermore, they became more dependable and had higher comfort levels relating to ethnically diverse groups. Finally, Service-Learners felt less alienated from others, had fewer problems with behavior and were less likely to be sent to the administrator for disciplinary reasons (Sephens, 1995 ; Follman, 1998 ; Melchoir, 1998 ; Morgan & Streb, 1999 ; Neal et al., 1994 ; Berkas, 1997 ; Shaffer, 1993 ; Loesh-Griffin et al., 1995).

Students involved in Service-Learning of a higher quality purported that they had increased their awareness of the community’s needs. They thought and felt like they could make a difference in their community in the future and that they had made meaningful contributions while they were engaged in higher levels of commitment towards serving others. Older students reflected more on politics and the operation of the United States Government. They showed increased interest in politics and political events and causes and considered how they might be able to make and sustain social changes. They also became more involved in community organizations, showed more responsibility towards voting and considered how they might be able to make and sustain social changes in contrast to children who did not participate. Students of all ages showed an increased awareness of civic responsibility, had higher moral character and were more ethical about serving those who were less fortunate ( (Melchoir, 1999 ; Westhemier & Khane, 2000 ; Yates & Youniss 1996, ; Perry, 1996 ; Morgan & Streb, 1999 ; Billig & Conrad, 1997 ; Scales & Blyth, 1997 ; Stephens, 1995 ; Berkas, 1997 ; Youniss et al., 1997 ; O’ Bannon, 1999 ; Billig, 2000).

With recent increased focus on standardized testing and scores, the public should take notice of the fact that Service-Learning increases academic skills and concept attainment. Specifically, gains on achievement tests have shown between slight to significant ranges in reading and writing. Students in Service-Learning curriculum became more engaged in classroom instruction and activities and showed more interest in completing their homework. In addition, higher scores were attained on state assessments. They earned higher grades and increased their grade point averages in 83% of the schools 76% of the time. In the area of reading for information in mathematics, students who participated in Service-Learning had higher scores than students who were not given the opportunity. On a crucial note for inner city administrators and educators, older students who participated in Service-Learning were less likely to become drop outs, engage in unprotected sex, become teenage parents and/or get involved in violent behavior and criminal activity. Furthermore, students of all ages who participated in Service-Learning had higher attendance percentages, were less likely to be tardy, were able to complete their class assignments more frequently, were more active with regards to class participation, showed improvement in problem solving skills, were more interested in the learning process as a whole and felt that they had learned more in Service-Learning experiences than others. Finally, with regards towards future career aspirations,  Service-Learners were better prepared for their future careers. They had more communication skills and became more aware of the opportunities and possibilities toward a variety of future careers (Weiler, 1998 ; Anderson, 1991 ; Schmuer, 1994 ; Shaffer, 1993 ; Dean & Murdock, 1992 ; O’Bannon, 1999 ; Akuiobi & Simmons, 1997 ; Billig et al., 1999 ;  Follman, 1997 ; Supik, 1996 ; Billig, 2000 ; Rolzinski, 1990 ; Duckenfield & Swanson, 1992 ; Loesch-Griffin et al., 1995 ; Stephens, 1995 ; Billig & Conrad, 1997 ; Melchoir, 1999 ; Weiler et al. 1998 ; Berkas, 1997 ; O’ Donnel et al., 1999 ; Allen et al., 1994). In schools that participated in Service-Learning curriculum, students were more respectful towards their teachers and showed higher levels of camaraderie and cohesiveness with their teachers.

In addition, there was less student mobility and teacher turnover in schools that focused on Service-Learning. Furthermore, it created more discussion with regards to creative teaching techniques and the reflective process. Educators became more collaborative and were involved in curriculum, instruction, and planning. Finally, on the other end of the spectrum, the community viewed students and schools involved in Service-Learning in a more positive light than students who were not involved in Service-Learning (Weiler et al., 1998 ; Berkas, 1997 ; Billig & Conrad, 1997 ; Pickeral, 1998 ; Melchior, 1999 ; Kinsley, 1997 ; Wade, 1997 ; Anderson et al. , 1991 Kingsland et al. 1995).

In conclusion, between the years of 1984-1997 Service-Learning grew tremendously. The number of students involved in Service-Learning increased by over ten million. Public schools now purport student’s involvement in Service-Learning to be between sixty and eighty percent. In addition, over fifty percent of articles written with regards to Service-Learning were viewed as favorable and/or supportive. Service-Learning has shown valid and reliable research in qualitative and quantitative meta analyses and quasi experimental studies along with affirmative reports and testimony for administrators, educators and students. It benefits everyone involved by creating a more productive learning environment and more responsible members of society. Furthermore, Service-Learning appears to be a legitimate way to educate children and there is substantial evidence that Service-Learning should be combined with national, state and district performance objectives and expectations. Finally, individuals from all Service-Learning groups make a difference when they are willing to go out into their community and serve those who are less fortunate. For those conditions, as well as others, they begin to reflect on existing conditions and possible ways to create social changes. They receive social and academic skills and engage in meaningful experiences that last a lifetime (Conrad & Hedin, 1991 ; Newmann & Rutter, ; APCO Associates, 1999 ; Skinner & Chapman, 1999 ; Billig, 2000).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Text of H.R. 1388: Generations Invigorating Volunteerism and Education Act/Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act

TITLE I--AMENDMENTS TO NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE ACT OF 1990

SEC. 1001. REFERENCES.

Except as otherwise specifically provided, whenever in this title an amendment or repeal is expressed in terms of an amendment to, or repeal of, a provision, the amendment or repeal shall be considered to be made to a provision of the National and Community Service Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12501 et seq.).

Subtitle A--Amendments to Subtitle A (General Provisions)

 

‘(18) support institutions of higher education that engage students in community service activities and provide high-quality service-learning opportunities; and

‘(19) recognize the expertise veterans can offer to national service programs, expand the participation of the veterans in the national service programs, and assist the families of veterans and members of the Armed Forces on active duty.’.

SEC. 1102. DEFINITIONS.

 

Subtitle B--Amendments to Subtitle B (Learn and Serve America)

SEC. 1201. SCHOOL-BASED ALLOTMENTS.

 

‘PART I--PROGRAMS FOR ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS

‘SEC. 111. PURPOSE.

‘The purpose of this part is to promote service-learning as a strategy to--

‘(1) support high-quality service-learning projects that engage students in meeting community needs with demonstrable results, while enhancing students’ academic and civic learning; and

‘(2) support efforts to build institutional capacity, including the training of educators, and to strengthen the service infrastructure to expand service opportunities.

 

‘(1) planning and building the capacity within the State, territory, or Indian tribe involved to implement service-learning programs that are based principally in elementary schools and secondary schools, including--

‘(A) providing training and professional development for teachers, supervisors, personnel from community-based entities (particularly with regard to the recruitment, utilization, and management of participants), and trainers, to be conducted by qualified individuals or organizations that have experience withservice-learning;

‘(B) developing service-learning curricula, consistent with State or local academic content standards, to be integrated into academic programs, including curricula for an age-appropriate learning component that provides participants an opportunity to analyze and apply their service experiences;

‘(C) forming local partnerships described in paragraph (2) or (4)(D) to develop school-based service-learning programs in accordance with this part;

‘(D) devising appropriate methods for research on and evaluation of the educational value of service-learning and the effect of service-learning activities on communities;

 

‘(2) implementing, operating, or expanding school-based service-learning programs, which may include paying for the cost of the recruitment, training, supervision, placement, salaries, and benefits of service-learning coordinators, through distribution by State educational agencies, territories, and Indian tribes of Federal funds made available under this part to projects operated by local partnerships among--

 

‘(3) planning of school-based service-learning programs, through distribution by State educational agencies, territories, and Indian tribes of Federal funds made available under this part to local educational agencies and Indian tribes, which planning may include paying for the cost of--

‘(A) the salaries and benefits of service-learning coordinators; or

‘(B) the recruitment, training and professional development, supervision, and placement of service-learning coordinators who may be participants in a program under subtitle C or receive a national service educational award under subtitle D, who may be participants in a project under section 201 of the Domestic Volunteer Service Act of 1973 (42 U.S.C. 5001), or who may participate in a Youthbuild program under section 173A of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (29 U.S.C. 2918a),

who will identify the community partners described in paragraph (2)(B) and assist in the design and implementation of a program described in paragraph (2);

‘(4) implementing, operating, or expanding school-based service-learning programs to utilize adult volunteers in service-learning to improve the education of students, through distribution by State educational agencies, territories, and Indian tribes of Federal funds made available under this part to--

 

‘(5) developing, as service-learning programs, civic engagement programs that promote a better understanding of--

‘(A) the principles of the Constitution, the heroes of United States history (including military heroes), and the meaning of the Pledge of Allegiance;

‘(B) how the Nation’s government functions; and

‘(C) the importance of service in the Nation’s character.

‘(b) Duties of Service-Learning Coordinator- A service-learning coordinator referred to in paragraph (2) or (3) of subsection (a) shall provide services to a local partnership described in subsection (a)(2) or entity described in subsection (a)(3), respectively, that may include--

‘(1) providing technical assistance and information to, and facilitating the training of, teachers and assisting in the planning, development, execution, and evaluation ofservice-learning in their classrooms;

‘(2) assisting local partnerships described in subsection (a)(2) in the planning, development, and execution of service-learning projects, including summer of service programs;

‘(3) assisting schools and local educational agencies in developing school policies and practices that support the integration of service-learning into the curriculum; and

 

‘(d) Special Rule- A State educational agency described in section 111A(2)(A) may designate a statewide entity (which may be a community-based entity) with demonstrated experience in supporting or implementing service-learning programs, to receive the State educational agency’s allotment under this part, and carry out the functions of the agency under this part.

‘(e) Consultation With Secretary of Education- The Corporation is authorized to enter into agreements with the Secretary of Education for initiatives (and may use funds authorized under section 501(a)(6) to enter into the agreements if the additional costs of the initiatives are warranted) that may include--

‘(1) identification and dissemination of research findings on service-learning and scientifically valid research based practices for service-learning; and

‘(2) provision of professional development opportunities that--

‘(A) improve the quality of service-learning instruction and delivery for teachers both preservice and in-service, personnel from community-based entities and youth workers; and

‘(B) create and sustain effective partnerships for service-learning programs between local educational agencies, community-based entities, businesses, and other stakeholders.

‘SEC. 112A. ALLOTMENTS.

 

‘(c) Reallotment- If the Corporation determines that the allotment of a State, territory, or Indian tribe under this section will not be required for a fiscal year because the State, territory, or Indian tribe did not submit and receive approval of an application for the allotment under section 113, the Corporation shall make the allotment for such State, territory, or Indian tribe available for grants to community-based entities to carry out service-learning programs as described in section 112(b) in such State, in such territory, or for such Indian tribe. After community-based entities apply for grants from the allotment, by submitting an application at such time and in such manner as the Corporation requires, and receive approval, the remainder of such allotment shall be available for reallotment to such other States, territories, or Indian tribes with approved applications submitted under section 113 as the Corporation may determine to be appropriate.

‘SEC. 113. APPLICATIONS.

‘(a) Applications to Corporation for Allotments-

 

‘(A) a proposal for a 3-year plan promoting service-learning, which shall contain such information as the Chief Executive Officer may reasonably require, including how the applicant will integrate service opportunities into the academic program of the participants;

 

‘(ii) include any opportunities for students, enrolled in schools or programs of education providing elementary or secondary education, to participate in service-learning programs and ensure that such service-learning programs include opportunities for such students to serve together;

‘(iii) involve participants in the design and operation of the programs;

‘(iv) promote service-learning in areas of greatest need, including low-income or rural areas; and

‘(v) otherwise integrate service opportunities into the academic program of the participants; and

‘(D) assurances that the applicant will comply with the nonduplication and nondisplacement requirements of section 177 and the notice, hearing, and grievance procedures required by section 176.

‘(b) Application to State, Territory, or Indian Tribe for Assistance To Carry Out School-BasedService-Learning Programs-

 

‘SEC. 114. CONSIDERATION OF APPLICATIONS.

‘(a) Criteria for Local Applications- In providing assistance under this part, a State educational agency, territory, or Indian tribe (or the Corporation if section 112A(c) applies) shall consider criteria with respect to sustainability, replicability, innovation, and quality of programs.

‘(b) Priority for Local Applications- In providing assistance under this part, a State educational agency, territory, or Indian tribe (or the Corporation if section 112A(c) applies) shall give priority to entities that submit applications under section 113 with respect to service-learning programs described in section 111 that are in the greatest need of assistance, such as programs targeting low-income areas or serving economically disadvantaged youth.

 

‘SEC. 115. PARTICIPATION OF STUDENTS AND TEACHERS FROM PRIVATE SCHOOLS.

‘(a) In General- To the extent consistent with the number of students in the State, in the territory, or served by the Indian tribe or in the school district of the local educational agency involved who are enrolled in private nonprofit elementary schools and secondary schools, such State, territory, or Indian tribe, or agency shall (after consultation with appropriate private school representatives) make provision--

‘(1) for the inclusion of services and arrangements for the benefit of such students so as to allow for the equitable participation of such students in the programs implemented to carry out the objectives and provide the benefits described in this part; and

‘(2) for the training of the teachers of such students so as to allow for the equitable participation of such teachers in the programs implemented to carry out the objectives and provide the benefits described in this part.

‘(b) Waiver- If a State, territory, Indian tribe, or local educational agency is prohibited by law from providing for the participation of students or teachers from private nonprofit schools as required by subsection (a), or if the Corporation determines that a State, territory, Indian tribe, or local educational agency substantially fails or is unwilling to provide for such participation on an equitable basis, the Chief Executive Officer shall waive such requirements and shall arrange for the provision of services to such students and teachers.

‘SEC. 116. FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL CONTRIBUTIONS.

 

‘(C) the institution or partnership may coordinate with service-learning curricula being offered in the academic curricula at the institution of higher education or at 1 or more members of the partnership;’; and

(C) in paragraph (3)--

(i) in the matter preceding subparagraph (A), by striking ‘teachers at the elementary, secondary, and postsecondary levels’ and inserting ‘institutions of higher education and their faculty’;

(ii) in subparagraph (A), by striking ‘education of the institution; and’ and inserting ‘curricula of the institution to strengthen the instructional capacity of teachers to provide service-learning at the elementary and secondary levels;’;

(iii) by redesignating subparagraph (B) as subparagraph (C); and

(iv) by inserting after subparagraph (A) the following:

‘(B) including service-learning as a component of other curricula or academic programs (other than education curricula or programs), such as curricula or programs relating to nursing, medicine, criminal justice, or public policy; and’;

 

‘(A)(i) the number of undergraduate and, if applicable, graduate service-learningcourses offered at such institution for the most recent full academic year preceding the fiscal year for which designation is sought; and

 

‘(d) Awards-

‘(1) IN GENERAL- Using sums reserved under section 501(a)(1)(C) for Campuses of Service, the Corporation shall provide an award of funds to institutions designated under subsection (c), to be used by the institutions to develop or disseminate service-learningmodels and information on best practices regarding service-learning to other institutions of higher education.

‘(2) PLAN- To be eligible to receive funds under this subsection, an institution designated under subsection (c) shall submit a plan to the Corporation describing how the institution intends to use the funds to develop or disseminate service-learning models and information on best practices regarding service-learning to other institutions of higher education.

‘(3) ALLOCATION- The Corporation shall determine how the funds reserved under section 501(a)(1)(C) for Campuses of Service for a fiscal year will be allocated among the institutions submitting acceptable plans under paragraph (2). In determining the amount of funds to be allocated to such an institution, the Corporation shall consider the number of students at the institution, the quality and scope of the plan submitted by the institution under paragraph (2), and the institution’s current (as of the date of submission of the plan) strategies to encourage or assist students to pursue public service careers in the nonprofit sector or government.’.

SEC. 1204. INNOVATIVE PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH.

Subtitle B of title I (42 U.S.C. 12521 et seq.), as amended by section 1203, is further amended by adding at the end the following:

‘PART III--INNOVATIVE AND COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICE-LEARNINGPROGRAMS AND RESEARCH

‘SEC. 119. INNOVATIVE AND COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICE-LEARNING PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH.

‘(a) Definitions- In this part:

‘(1) ELIGIBLE ENTITY- The term ‘eligible entity’ means a State educational agency, a State Commission, a territory, an Indian tribe, an institution of higher education, or a public or private nonprofit organization (including community-based entities), a public or private elementary school or secondary school, a local educational agency, a consortium of such entities, or a consortium of 2 or more such entities and a for-profit organization.

‘(2) ELIGIBLE PARTNERSHIP- The term ‘eligible partnership’ means a partnership that--

‘(A) shall include--

‘(i) 1 or more community-based entities that have demonstrated records of success in carrying out service-learning programs with economically disadvantaged students, and that meet such criteria as the Chief Executive Officer may establish; and

‘(ii) a local educational agency for which--

 

‘(4) YOUTH ENGAGEMENT ZONE PROGRAM- The term ‘youth engagement zone program’ means a service-learning program in which members of an eligible partnership collaborate to provide coordinated school-based or community-based service-learningopportunities--

‘(A) in order to address a specific community challenge;

‘(B) for an increasing percentage of out-of-school youth and secondary school students served by a local educational agency; and

‘(C) in circumstances under which--

‘(i) not less than 90 percent of such students participate in service-learningactivities as part of the program; or

‘(ii) service-learning is a part of the curriculum in all of the secondary schools served by the local educational agency.

‘(b) General Authority- From the amounts appropriated to carry out this part for a fiscal year, the Corporation may make grants (which may include approved summer of service positions in the case of a grant for a program described in subsection (c)(8)) and fixed-amount grants (in accordance with section 129(l)) to eligible entities or eligible partnerships, as appropriate, for programs and activities described in subsection (c).

‘(c) Authorized Activities- Funds under this part may be used to--

‘(1) integrate service-learning programs into the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (referred to in this part as ‘STEM’) curricula at the elementary, secondary, postsecondary, or postbaccalaureate levels in coordination with practicing or retired STEM professionals;

‘(2) involve students in service-learning programs focusing on energy conservation in their community, including conducting educational outreach on energy conservation and working to improve energy efficiency in low-income housing and in public spaces;

‘(3) involve students in service-learning programs in emergency and disaster preparedness;

‘(4) involve students in service-learning programs aimed at improving access to and obtaining the benefits from computers and other emerging technologies, including improving such access for individuals with disabilities, in low-income or rural communities, in senior centers and communities, in schools, in libraries, and in other public spaces;

‘(5) involve high school age youth in the mentoring of middle school youth while involving all participants in service-learning to seek to meet unmet human, educational, environmental, public safety, or emergency and disaster preparedness needs in their community;

‘(6) conduct research and evaluations on service-learning, including service-learning in middle schools, and disseminate such research and evaluations widely;

‘(7) conduct innovative and creative activities as described in section 112(a);

‘(8) establish or implement summer of service programs (giving priority to programs that enroll youth who will be enrolled in any of grades 6 through 9 at the end of the summer concerned) during the summer months (including recruiting, training, and placing service-learning coordinators)--

‘(A) for youth who will be enrolled in any of grades 6 through 12 at the end of the summer concerned; and

‘(B) for community-based service-learning projects--

‘(i) that shall--

‘(I) meet unmet human, educational, environmental (including energy conservation and stewardship), and emergency and disaster preparedness and other public safety needs; and

‘(II) be intensive, structured, supervised, and designed to produce identifiable improvements to the community;

‘(ii) that may include the extension of academic year service-learningprograms into the summer months; and

‘(iii) under which a student who completes 100 hours of service as described in section 146(b)(2), shall be eligible for a summer of service educational award of $500 or $750 as described in sections 146(a)(2)(C) and 147(d);

‘(9) establish or implement youth engagement zone programs in youth engagement zones, for students in secondary schools served by local educational agencies for which a majority of such students do not participate in service-learning activities that are--

 

‘(A) carried out by eligible partnerships; and

‘(B) designed to--

‘(i) involve all students in secondary schools served by the local educational agency in service-learning to address a specific community challenge;

‘(ii) improve student engagement, including student attendance and student behavior, and student achievement, graduation rates, and college-going rates at secondary schools; and

‘(iii) involve an increasing percentage of students in secondary school and out-of-school youth in the community in school-based or community-basedservice-learning activities each year, with the goal of involving all students in secondary schools served by the local educational agency and involving an increasing percentage of the out-of-school youth in service-learningactivities; and

‘(10) conduct semester of service programs that--

‘(A) provide opportunities for secondary school students to participate in a semester of coordinated school-based or community-based service-learningopportunities for a minimum of 70 hours (of which at least a third will be spent participating in field-based activities) over a semester, to address specific community challenges;

‘(B) engage as participants high percentages or numbers of economically disadvantaged students;

‘(C) allow participants to receive academic credit, for the time spent in the classroom and in the field for the program, that is equivalent to the academic credit for any class of equivalent length and with an equivalent time commitment; and

‘(D) ensure that the classroom-based instruction component of the program is integrated into the academic program of the local educational agency involved; and

‘(11) carry out any other innovative service-learning programs or research that the Corporation considers appropriate.

‘(d) Applications- To be eligible to receive a grant to carry out a program or activity under this part, an entity or partnership, as appropriate, shall prepare and submit to the Corporation an application at such time and in such manner as the Chief Executive Officer may reasonably require, and obtain approval of the application.

‘(e) Priority- In making grants under this part, the Corporation shall give priority to applicants proposing to--

‘(1) involve students and community stakeholders in the design and implementation ofservice-learning programs carried out using funds received under this part;

‘(2) implement service-learning programs in low-income or rural communities; and

‘(3) utilize adult volunteers, including tapping the resources of retired and retiring adults, in the planning and implementation of service-learning programs.

‘(f) Requirements-

‘(1) TERM- Each program or activity funded under this part shall be carried out over a period of 3 years, which may include 1 planning year. In the case of a program funded under this part, the 3-year period may be extended by 1 year, if the program meets performance levels established in accordance with section 179(k) and any other criteria determined by the Corporation.

‘(2) COLLABORATION ENCOURAGED- Each entity carrying out a program or activity funded under this part shall, to the extent practicable, collaborate with entities carrying out programs under this subtitle, subtitle C, and titles I and II of the Domestic Volunteer Service Act of 1973 (42 U.S.C. 4951 et seq., 5001 et seq.).

‘(3) EVALUATION- Not later than 4 years after the effective date of the Serve America Act, the Corporation shall conduct an independent evaluation of the programs and activities carried out using funds made available under this part, and determine best practices relating to service-learning and recommendations for improvement of those programs and activities. The Corporation shall widely disseminate the results of the evaluations, and information on the best practices and recommendations to the service community through multiple channels, including the Corporation’s Resource Center or a clearinghouse of effective strategies.’.

SEC. 1205. SERVICE-LEARNING IMPACT STUDY.

Subtitle B of title I (42 U.S.C. 12521 et seq.), as amended by section 1204, is further amended by adding at the end the following:

‘PART IV--SERVICE-LEARNING IMPACT STUDY

‘SEC. 120. STUDY AND REPORT.

‘(a) Study-

‘(1) IN GENERAL- From the sums reserved under section 501(a)(1)(B) for this section, the Corporation shall enter into a contract with an entity that is not otherwise a recipient of financial assistance under this subtitle, to conduct a 10-year longitudinal study on the impact of the activities carried out under this subtitle.

‘(2) CONTENTS- In conducting the study, the entity shall consider the impact of service-learning activities carried out under this subtitle on students participating in such activities, including in particular examining the degree to which the activities--

‘(A) improved student academic achievement;

‘(B) improved student engagement;

‘(C) improved graduation rates, as defined in section 1111(b)(2)(C)(vi) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 6311(b)(2)(C)(vi)) and as clarified in applicable regulations promulgated by the Department of Education; and

‘(D) improved the degree to which the participants in the activities engaged in subsequent national service, volunteering, or other service activities, or pursued careers in public service, in the nonprofit sector or government.

‘(3) ANALYSIS- In carrying out such study, the entity shall examine the impact of theservice-learning activities on the 4 factors described in subparagraphs (A) through (D) of paragraph (2), analyzed in terms of how much time participants were engaged in service-learning activities.

‘(4) BEST PRACTICES- The entity shall collect information on best practices concerning using service-learning activities to improve the 4 factors.

‘(b) Interim Reports- The entity shall periodically submit reports to the Corporation containing the interim results of the study and the information on best practices. The Corporation shall submit such reports to the authorizing committees.

‘(c) Final Report- The entity shall submit a report to the Corporation containing the results of the study and the information on best practices. The Corporation shall submit such report to the authorizing committees, and shall make such report available to the public on the Corporation’s website.

‘(d) Consultation and Dissemination- On receiving the report described in subsection (c), the Corporation shall consult with the Secretary of Education to review the results of the study, and to identify best practices concerning using service-learning activities to improve the 4 factors described in subparagraphs (A) through (D) of subsection (a)(2). The Corporation shall disseminate information on the identified best practices.’.

Subtitle C--Amendments to Subtitle C (National Service Trust Program

 

‘(v) working with schools and youth programs to educate students and youth about ways to reduce home energy use and improve the environment, including conducting service-learning projects to provide such education;

(G) in paragraph (9) (as so redesignated)--

(i) in the paragraph heading, by striking ‘SERVICE LEARNING’ and inserting ‘SERVICE-LEARNING’; and

(ii) in the matter preceding subparagraph (A), by striking ‘service learning’ and inserting ‘service-learning’.

 


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Update...December 19, 2008

YOU can STOP THIS!   WE can STOP THIS!

For $7.50, Less than a movie, you can provide food for a starving child.

http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/donate/fieldpartners/

 

$0.25 cents a day provides two nourishing meals every day for a month to a child threatened by famine.

We endeavor to create a chapter that will support Doctor's Without Borders in the future.

At least this way, the next time you see a starving child, you can feel hopeful and not hopeless, and powerful instead of powerless.

Ideally, if everyone who owned a credit card did this, the problem probably would not exist.

And remember... Every time you sit down to eat a meal, figuratively speaking, there is a cute, smiling, child sitting across from single you, and/or you and your family enjoying your generosity.

Your family size has increased, and for those who dislike eating alone, figuratively speaking, you'll never eat alone!

Please share this message with your friends and family and pass it on!

Spread it like wildfire throughout the world!

 

 

 

 

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